Thoughts on startups by investors that
fund them & entrepreneurs that run them

Don’t Forget Grants If You Need Early Seed Money

In the US, many entrepreneurs see grants as “free money,” since they are not loans and don’t have to be repaid. A grant is not an equity investment, so the entrepreneur doesn’t have to give up a stake in the company either. Typically they can be used to fund product development and commercialization that would otherwise require outside investors.

A good place to start looking is the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, which is a lifeline for high-tech startups. A more general approach is to check out Grants.gov, which is a searchable directory of more than 1,000 federal grant programs. An advanced search tool is provided to search for a grant by eligibility, by issuing agency, or category.

Grants start as small a few thousand dollars, but can provide millions of dollars in capital to new ventures. But before you conclude that your funding problems are solved with grants, you should consider the direct and indirect costs of grant funding:

  • Grant applications are bureaucratic. Even experienced people dealing with grants tell me that it can take a couple of months of concerted effort to gather data, fill out the forms, and get the necessary certifications to submit a credible grant application. That is time and resource that you must add to the million other high-priority startup tasks.
  • Processing and approvals take time. If you meet all the requirements, complete all the paperwork, and submit your grant application today, it will likely be six to nine months before you see any money. In today’s fast moving technology world, that may give your competitor the edge, or your startup may wither and die waiting.
  • Professional help costs money. Of course, there are “experts” at grant preparation, available for a fee, and even people who can introduce you to key decision makers in the grant approval process. For all the value of a large grant, isn’t it worth a small investment to get your application “on the fast path,” and optimize your selection probabilities?
  • Stringent spending controls. Since government grants are funded by tax dollars for specific industries and research, usage of grant funds is carefully monitored. For example, federal and state governments don’t provide grants for starting a business, paying off debts, or covering operational expenses. Violations can lead to jail time.

Here are a few tips that I would recommend to startup clients, on how to position themselves for funding success through grants:

  1. Use local university connections. For university professors, grants are their lifeblood, and they know the process well. They need you, since grants associated with commercializing products are favored over ones allocated simply for academic study and papers. If they do the application for you, and get to publish the results, that’s a win-win situation.
  2. Pursue grants and investors in parallel. Putting your grant application intent and status in your business plan will greatly enhance your potential to get Angel funding for the interim. To the investors, it means less dilution and lower overall risk.
  3. Research related tax credits and incentives. You need to enhance your business plan and marketing with all the benefits to your customers of the multiple “stimulus” plans and tax breaks now being put together, especially related to alternative energy products.
  4. Extend your networking. Let’s face it, the business world and the political world are getting tightly intertwined. It’s time for you to meet state and local government officials, make them aware of what you are doing, and get them excited and working for you.

Money has always been tight for high-tech entrepreneurs who need to raise capital from investors willing to gamble on a new idea. Even though the situation is improving, and we now have crowd funding to fill in the gaps, there is never enough investment money to go around. Now is the time to get on the grant bandwagon, but do it with your eyes open, and budget for it.

Written by Martin Zwilling

user Martin Zwilling Founder and CEO,
Startup Professionals

Martin is a veteran startup mentor, executive, blogger, author, tech professional, and angel investor. He is the Founder and CEO of Startup Professionals, a company that provides products and services to startup founders and small business owners.

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