Thoughts on startups by investors that
fund them & entrepreneurs that run them

Category Archives: How To Fundraise

How To Secure A Lead Investor

By Paula Taas, Founder Institute

You’ve created an amazing founding team, you’ve built a brilliant product that has been gaining a lot of traction, and now you’re looking to expand your company. How do you continue to build your business? By searching for a lead investor in your next funding round.

The lead investor is the first step in

Read more >

Should I give my seed investors anti-dilution protection?

What this investor is seeking is called “permanent, full-ratchet, anti-dilution protection”, and that is neither (a) in line with the market, nor (b) practical. Even if you were willing to give it to him, it is highly, highly unlikely to stand up beyond the next financing round, because there’s no way your next investor is going to take a dilution

Read more >

Crowdfunding: KickStarter, Indiegogo, AngelList, Gust: How to choose?

First, it’s important to understand that the four platforms you list fall into two very distinct groups.

Kickstarter and IndieGoGo are project-based crowdfunding platforms through which anyone can contribute money, either as a donation or with the promise that they will receive a tangible ‘reward’ of some kind if the project is successful.

Gust and AngelList are equity-based platforms, used by Accredited Investors  to facilitate the investment of money for an ownership interest in a company.

As such,

Read more >

How do I get in touch with investors/funds with just an idea and no product?

There are many wonderful ideas, and they are not necessarily easy to come up with. So congratulations on having thought of one!

However…

“Having value” and “Being fundable” are two completely different things. What the more experienced responders here are saying is completely accurate: while a good idea is usually a necessary ingredient for the formation of a good company, it is not sufficient by itself

Read more >

How long does it take for investors to approve the idea and to grant the necessary investment?

The question is based on a misunderstanding of how venture capital investment works.

First of all, VC funds do not invest in ideas. What VCs invest in are operating  companies that are ready (or almost ready) to scale. There are many wonderful ideas, all of which are not fundable. Only companies get funded.

Next, VCs don’t have an unlimited amount of money that is

Read more >

In a seed round, is it poor form to accept a lower cap from later investors?

There are a [very] few companies, mostly on the West Coast, that have done convertible rounds with differing caps, but it’s unusual, hard to do, and not something that will endear you to the less-fortunate investors.

What is the worst startup pitch ever?

Take your choice (these are both real, honest-to-God pitches, and I’ve got the originals in my possession):

Contestant A
CluelessCo is an internet startup company seeking $2 million of equity financing to fund our company for at least one year. CluelessCo will become the main consumer outlet for the internet, digital cable and satellite TV, and cell phones and PDAs.

What’s actually required to start or close a funding round?

Technically, a “funding round” simply means a company accepting one or more investments from one or more investors on similar terms within a certain period of time. As such, this could cover many different things, such as:

Your parents loaning you money to cover your expenses while you code your product
25 individual angel investors funding a startup on a convertible note
two

Read more >

Is it a good idea to ask for investments on your webpage?

No, because it is almost certainly against the law or regulations wherever you’re located (in the US it would be called General Solicitation).

When do you startups begin fund raising?

If founding a startup was easy, there would be a lot more of them, and the percentage that are successful would be much higher.

Unfortunately, it isn’t.

The essence of entrepreneurship is creating a new venture where one does not already exist in the market as you find it. As such, the founding process is one in which the entrepreneur is competing

Read more >